Disciplines: Dental
Hours: 12 Contact Hours
Item#: LGTMU OX 12

2018 Dental Value Pack


Reg. Prices $119.80
Just $49.95
Item # LGTMU

Contact hours will be awarded until this pack’s expiration date of 11/30/19.

Want more variety or need additional hours? Visit WesternSchools.com to choose from our library of more than 120 individual courses for Dental Professionals, plus state bundles and the WS365 Online Dental Annual Membership.

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Complications Associated With Oral Surgery, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0911  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Release Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

This course addresses common complications associated with oral surgical procedures and outlines the evidence-based methods to prevent, minimize, or manage them. Patient education about what to expect postoperatively helps minimize emergency after-hours phone calls and the need for additional treatment. Proper techniques of postoperative pain or infection control may also facilitate the healing process and reduce both postoperative complications for patients and stress for practitioners.

This basic-level course for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants will strengthen the dental team’s ability to identify common complications associated with oral surgery procedures and minimize, manage, and treat postoperative complications.

 

AGD Subject Code: 310

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify common complications associated with oral surgery procedures.
  • Discuss methods to minimize, manage, and treat postoperative complications.
Author Bio(s)

Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Nutrition for the Dental Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0912  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 5, 2016

Expiration Date: July 4, 2019

Poor nutrition can lead to caries, periodontal problems, and loss of teeth and bone. In addition, nutritional problems can put our patients at risk for certain systemic diseases and conditions such as heart problems, cancer, stroke and diabetes. This basic-level course reviews several important areas concerning proper nutrition for the dental patient including antioxidants, sugars, fats, the special nutritional needs of pregnant patients, and the intake of mercury, calcium and Vitamin D.

 

AGD Subject Code: 150

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify different antioxidants and their dietary sources.
  • List several sugar substitutes.
  • Describe different types of fats.
  • Describe the role of dietary mercury.
  • Explain the importance of calcium and vitamin D.
  • Describe the special dietary needs and concerns of pregnant dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

Ronald M. Mancini, DDS, maintains a private dental practice in Bethesda, Maryland. He is a member of the American Dental Association (ADA), the Maryland State Dental Association (MSDA), and the Southern Maryland Dental Society (SMDS). Dr. Mancini has held several positions with the SMDS, including those of trustee, president, vice president, treasurer, and editor, as well as serving as a delegate and head of the delegation to the MSDA House of Delegates.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Ethical Decision Making in Dental Practice, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0913  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: August 1, 2016

Expiration Date: July 31, 2019

Ethical questions cannot be answered by “dental science”; rather, it is often necessary to delve into broader, more basic questions that do not have clear-cut answers and require thoughtful reflection by professionals. What does it mean, for example, to be a professional? What are my obligations to this given patient, my colleagues, my community, and to myself? Ethical decision making is also required in relatively narrow questions: What would be in this patient’s best interests? Should I advertise my services in this manner, or even at all?

This basic-level course introduces the concept of ethical decision making and provides three ethical decision-making models to help dental healthcare providers navigate complex dilemmas. Case studies are used to help reinforce important ideas and provide a practical application of the concepts. The ability to systematically analyze and solve any ethical dilemma is arguably as important as the technical skills required to perform clinical dentistry.

 

AGD Subject Code: 555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Differentiate between legal and ethical concerns.
  • Describe historical contributions of ethical theories.
  • Explain the relationship between dentistry and professionalism.
  • Describe the principles outlined in the American Dental Association (ADA) Principles of Ethics, Code of Professional Conduct, and Advisory Opinions.
  • Explain the elements and principles of ethical decision making based on case scenarios.
Author Bio(s)

Steven E. Davis, MS, LMLP, LCP, has more than 23 years of experience as a psychologist and psychotherapist in behavioral and mental healthcare settings. A licensed psychologist in the state of Kansas, Davis earned his master’s degree in applied/clinical psychology from Fort Hays State University. He has been a psychologist and clinician for emergency intervention and screening at Prairie View, a regional behavioral healthcare center, and an adjunct instructor at Newman University, in Wichita. His articles and research have appeared in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, and Psychology in the Schools, among others.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and a master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette Univdersity and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Managing the Adult Dental Phobic Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0910  

Release Date:  July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

Dental phobia may be a universal barrier to seeking oral health care. Dental phobics are not comfortable seeking regular dental care, even when dental problems arise. The dental team needs to be aware of the concerns of this population in order to reduce fear and anxiety and provide needed oral health care.

This basic-level course distinguishes between the definitions of fear, anxiety, and phobia. It identifies the most common reactions that accompany phobias and common reasons for avoidance of dental treatment. The course describes the behavioral treatment options for anxious dental patients and techniques for reducing general anxiety in dental patients. This course will provide dental professionals with basic knowledge and information on dental fear and avoidance that will enable them to diagnose and manage patients who experience dental-related anxiety, fear, and phobia. This knowledge will help dental professionals prepare for these patients and their unique needs and help these patients feel more comfortable seeking their care in the future.

 

AGD Subject Code: 153; California Course #03-4640-16-737

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define fear, anxiety, and phobia and their common behavioral manifestations.
  • Distinguish among the four types of anxiety.
  • Identify the techniques used to reduce anxiety in dental patients.
  • Describe the psychological and pharmacological treatment techniques used to manage dental fears, phobias, and anxiety.
  • Describe an effective local injection technique used for fearful or phobic dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.