Disciplines: Occupational Therapy
Hours: 12 Contact Hours
Item#: IGTMU OX 12

2018 Occupational Therapy Value Pack


Reg. Prices $139.75
Just $49.95
Item # IGTMU

Contact hours will be awarded until this pack’s expiration date of 11/30/19.

Want to choose your own course topics? Visit WesternSchools.com to choose from our library of nearly 50 courses for Occupational Therapists and Occupational Therapy Assistants, and learn more about the WS365 Online OT Membership program.

This product includes the following courses:
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Ethical Practices with Older Adults, Revised Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6440  

The number of older adults (age 65 and older) living in the United States is growing rapidly. Almost 60 million older adults were living in the United States in 2016. This number is projected to rise to over 72 million by 2030, when approximately one in five U.S. residents will be age 65 or older. The rapid growth of the older population results from multiple factors including medical advances, life-prolonging technologies, and the aging of the Baby Boom generation (whose members began turning 65 years old in 2011).
 
In coming years, healthcare professionals will face this aging of the population, along with the accompanying health and economic challenges. The purpose of this course is to highlight ethical issues that may confront healthcare and behavioral health professionals working with older adults and their families as these individuals near the end of life. Many of these issues are related to advances in medical technologies that have occurred over the past several decades (and that continue to be developed) and have led to increasingly complex choices. The course will provide background on ethical frameworks and principles used in healthcare settings for guidance in resolving ethical problems. This course will also identify major ethical issues concerning older adults and healthcare decisions and provide a model for addressing ethical dilemmas in healthcare settings.
 
This basic-level course is written for healthcare professionals, including nurses, social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, occupational and physical therapy practitioners, and respiratory therapists. Other healthcare professionals who work with older adults and on interdisciplinary teams will also find the information presented useful to their practice.

 

AOTA Content Focus - OT Process: Evaluation; Professional Issues: Legal, Legislative, and Regulatory

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify frameworks and principles commonly used in healthcare settings for resolving ethical problems.
  • Recognize the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas.
  • Distinguish between capacity and competence.
  • Describe the concept of advance care planning.
  • Identify the hierarchy used in surrogate decision making.
  • Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies.
Author Bio(s)

Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults.

Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master’s of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kathy Black, PhD, MSW, MSG, MPH, is an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, and is a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar. Dr. Black obtained her doctorate from the University at Albany-SUNY, a master’s degree in social work and gerontology from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles. A fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Dr. Black has worked with older adults and their families as a nurse, social worker, and geriatric case manager for more than 25 years in acute care and long-term care in home-based and community-based settings. She has also taught courses in ethics and served on the bioethics committee of a large integrated healthcare system.

Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PhD, PCS, is vice-chair and professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC). She holds a BS in physical therapy from Southwestern Medical School (1971), an MA in college teaching from the University of North Carolina (1976), and a PhD in academic administration/health education from Texas A&M University (1989). Dr. Lovelace-Chandler served as chairperson for the University of Central Arkansas and Chapman University programs in physical therapy and as associate director of the School of Physical Therapy at Texas Woman’s University before joining UNTHSC. She has taught ethics for more than 30 years to professional and post-professional physical therapy students. She has more than 40 years of experience in pediatrics and has twice recertified as a pediatric specialist. Dr. Lovelace-Chandler has served in numerous American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) elected leadership positions, teaches advanced clinical practice courses for APTA, and has published articles and book chapters in pediatrics. She delivered the 2011 Linda Crane Memorial Lecture at APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting in New Orleans, and she won the Commission on Accreditation and Physical Therapy Education Distinguished Service Award in April of 2014.

Chronic Illness and Depression

Price: $24.95 
Item # I6441  

This  basic-level course addresses the knowledge gap by providing rehabilitation  professionals with an overview of the co-occurrence of depression and chronic conditions and identifying challenges in screening and referring adults with chronic conditions and depression. It provides explanations for potential causes of and contributing factors to depression unique to individuals with chronic medical conditions. Although individuals with chronic conditions are at increased risk for depression, this course also explores factors that may enhance such individuals’ well-being and diminish the likelihood of depression.

AOTA Content Focus - Domain of OT: Client Factor; OT Process: Evaluation

0.2 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the co-occurrence of depression and chronic illness.
  • Recognize the symptoms of depression and appropriate assessment tools to screen for depression.
  • Identify common causes and contributing risk and protective factors for depression in individuals in medical populations.
  • Describe treatment approaches for depression in individuals with chronic illness.
  • Describe the implications of chronic illness and depression on physical and occupational therapy practice.
Author Bio(s)
Alexandra L. Terrill, PhD, received her PhD in clinical psychology from Washington State University, with specialized training in clinical health psychology. She also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington in rehabilitation psychology. During her fellowship, she was involved in research on aging with physical disabilities associated with chronic conditions. Dr. Terrill is currently a faculty member at the University of Utah, Division of Occupational Therapy. Her research encompasses three basic areas: (1) stress, coping/adjustment, and chronic health conditions; (2) using strengths-based interventions (positive psychology); and (3) aging. Her broad goal is to improve our understanding of how social, psychological, and biological processes interact to affect individuals aging with a chronic condition and develop interventions that enhance productivity and quality of life from early to late adulthood. She is particularly interested in investigating and enhancing protective factors involved in the prevention of and adjustment to chronic medical conditions and associated disability.
 
Brandon Abbs, PhD, earned his PhD in psychology from the University of Iowa and a BA in psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He was most recently a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. During this fellowship, he was involved in research projects on the relationship between maternal infection during pregnancy and a child’s risk for schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and early cognitive decline. He studied this relationship using neuroimaging and neuropsychology. He is currently a senior medical writer for a biotechnology company in Boston, where he composes documents needed to conduct clinical trials in oncology and to inform people about specific cancer types and available treatments.
 
Julie Heinrichs, PT, DPT, earned her BA in English and master’s in Physical Therapy from Marquette University in Milwaukee and a Doctor of Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. She has over a decade of experience working with adults in a variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. Because of her experience in working with patients with mental health challenges, she has developed a profes­sional interest in the interactions between mental and physical health. She is currently the Physical Therapy Education Planner at Western Schools.
Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

John G. Cagle, PhD, MSW, is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work in Baltimore. His work focuses on the psychosocial dimensions of family caregiving and coping with life-threatening illness. As a clinician-researcher, his scholarship is informed by nearly a decade of experience as a hospice social worker. His scholarship includes work on the application of cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches with families coping with serious, life-threatening illness. His research has also included clinical trials to assess for and address barriers to pain management in hospice care, efforts to improve palliative care in long-term care settings, and an evaluation of caregiving at the end of life. His work has been supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation, the National Palliative Care Research Center, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Institutes of Health.

Jessica J. Bolduc, DrOT, MSOTR/L, received her master’s degree from the University of New England in 2005 and her doctorate in 2013 from Nova Southeastern University. Her clinical experience spans the continuum of care, including acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing, and home health. Dr. Bolduc has served as adjunct professor in the occupational therapy department at the University of New England and the University of Southern Maine, where she taught courses on physical dysfunction. She served as vice president of the Vermont Occupational Therapy Association for two years and as president for three years. She is currently active with the Maine Occupational Therapy Association as President-Elect. Dr. Bolduc is licensed in occupational therapy in four states and is a certified clinical fieldwork educator. She has published in OT Practice, The Internet Journal of Allied Health, Sciences and Practice, and has written textbook chapters in Gerontology for The HealthCare Practitioner and Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence. She has presented at national and state occupational therapy conferences. In addition to her ongoing work as a staff occupational therapist, Dr. Bolduc serves as the Occupational Therapy Planner at Western Schools, an AOTA-approved provider of continuing education.

Therapeutic Exercise and the Older Adult: An Evidence-Based Approach, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # I6443  

This intermediate level course is designed to educate OTs and OTAs on the implementation of exercise prescriptions in older adults. This course will review the multiple age-related systemic changes that take place in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and musculoskeletal systems and describe how exercise may mitigate these changes. This course will also provide recommended exercise prescriptions according to the most recent American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for older adults and discuss common barriers for exercise participation in older adults.

 

AOTA Content Focus - OT Process: Intervention

0.4 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the changes that take place in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, and musculoskeletal systems with aging.
  • Describe the benefits and explain an appropriate exercise intervention to mitigate age-related changes.
  • Explain common barriers to exercise in older adults.
  • Identify appropriate tests for clinical use to measure change after an aerobic or resistance exercise intervention.
  • Explain special considerations when prescribing exercise for older adults with comorbid conditions.
Author Bio(s)

Odessa Addison, DPT, PhD, is a physical therapist with many years of experience working with older adults. Dr. Addison received her DPT in 2005 and a doctorate in rehabilitation science in 2012, both from the University of Utah, where her focus of study was neuromuscular adaptations in the older adult. Her dissertation focused on how physical activity influenced inflammation, fat in the muscle, and mobility in older adults. Dr. Addison has presented at the American Diabetes Association, the American Physical Therapy Association Combined Section, the Gerontological Society of America, and the International Conference for Sarcopenia and Frailty Research. Dr. Addison has written on a broad range of topics concerning exercise and older adults. Her writings have been published in the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy; Physical Therapy; the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy; and the Journal of Nutrition, Health, and Aging. She is currently a research associate at the University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine in the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Jessica J. Bolduc, DrOT, MSOTR/L, received her master’s degree from the University of New England in 2005 and her doctorate in 2013 from Nova Southeastern University. Her clinical experience spans the continuum of care, including acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing, and home health. Dr. Bolduc is an adjunct professor at the University of New England, where she teaches courses on research and scholarly inquiry. She served as vice president of the Vermont Occupational Therapy Association for 2 years and as president for 3 years. She is currently active with the Maine Occupational Therapy Association and will serve as President-elect starting in January 2018. Dr. Bolduc was selected to join the first cohort of the Emerging Leaders Development Program of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and was subsequently appointed to the AOTA’s Emerging Leaders Development Committee and Volunteer Leadership Development Committee. She has received three service commendations from the AOTA, as well as the Young Alumni Award from the University of New England and the Alpha Eta Richard E. Davis Service Award from Nova Southeastern University. She was inducted into the Nu Sigma Upsilon Chapter of the Alpha Eta Society for scholarly accomplishments at Nova Southeastern University. Dr. Bolduc is licensed in occupational therapy in four states and is a certified clinical fieldwork educator. She has published in OT Practice and the Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice and has written chapters in Gerontology for The HealthCare Practitioner and Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence. She has presented at national and state occupational therapy conferences. In addition to her ongoing work as a staff occupational therapist, Dr. Bolduc served as the occupational therapy planner for Western Schools, an AOTA-approved provider of continuing education.

Occupation-Based Intervention as an Integrative Tool: Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Address

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6389  

This intermediate level course, will prepare OT practitioners to recognize symptoms of addiction in their clients and to identify the impact of these symptoms on occupational performance in and outside of therapy. Practitioners who have met the objectives of this course will possess the resources to create and implement an evidence-based intervention plan for dually-diagnosed clients and/or clients with physical health conditions that are affected by addiction. This course is intended for practitioners who are skilled in the occupational therapy process but wish to expand their knowledge of integrated, holistic care models rooted in current evidence. This course is particularly relevant for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants working within newly established Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHCs). 

AOTA Content Focus - OT Process: evaluation, intervention, outcomes

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence of addiction and its impact on communities and individuals’ occupational lives and overall wellness, and list risk factors for addiction and mental illness.
  • Identify two neurological systems associated with addiction and their roles in overall function, as well as how changes in these systems and genetic influences manifest as symptoms of addiction and mental illness.
  • Distinguish effective occupation-based interventions for treating substance use disorders and mental illness, and identify associated occupation-based theories/models.
  • Define “readiness to change,” list appropriate assessment tools to determine readiness to change, and differentiate and describe appropriate evidence-based interventions for each stage.
  • Describe reasons for the adoption of Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment (IDDT) as evidence-based practice in mental health care and list at least five components of this approach.
Author Bio(s)

Sally Wasmuth, PhD, MA, OTR, received her PhD in critical and philosophical studies of biology from the University of Exeter in 2012. She has also received a master of arts degree in philosophy of biology (2007) and a master of science degree in occupational therapy (2011), and completed a 2-year postdoctoral training at the Roudebush Veterans Administration Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Wasmuth has been conducting research on the neurobiology of addiction and the bidirectional relationships between addiction and human occupation since 2006, and has published several papers on the subject in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, the American, British, and Canadian Journals of Occupational Therapy, and the Journal of Occupational Science. She has coauthored papers on mental health employee burnout and integrated dual disorder treatment (IDDT) implementation and has been the principle or co-investigator on several related grants. Dr. Wasmuth has published her own theoretical model of addiction and piloted an occupation-based treatment approach to facilitate community engagement in people recovering from addiction, which is now being examined via a controlled, comparison trial. She is also the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) ambassador for the state of Indiana’s Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHC) planning grant. Dr. Wasmuth has taught mental health to doctoral- and masters-level occupational therapy students since 2013 and has been an invited guest lecturer at several universities including the University of Southern California and Indiana University. She was recently the invited plenary speaker at the International Institute on the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), where she discussed the concept of addiction-as-occupation.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Karen McCarthy, OTD, OTR/L, began her career as an occupational therapist in the research study The USC Well Elderly Study II: Health Mediating Effects of the Well Elderly Program. She completed her clinical doctorate in occupational therapy at the University of Southern California in 2008, focusing on the development of the program Lifestyle Redesign® for the College Student. She then moved from Los Angeles to Ireland, to teach mental health occupational therapy at University College Cork, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy from 2012 to 2016. She commenced her position at Dominican University of California in fall 2016, teaching psychosocial aspects of occupation. Her clinical experience is in the areas of mental health, Lifestyle Redesign®, life coaching, dating coaching, older adults, multiple sclerosis, college student wellness, domestic violence, and substance abuse. Her research interests include mental health and occupational science.